Ama Ata Aidoo

TRIBUTE TO DR. DORIS YAA DARTEY (1953-2020) My Dear Doris, to say I miss you already does not begin to describe how I feel. So many days after the shocking news of your death hit me a

nd the Ghana media space, l have kept asking myself why l cannot just be a good Christian and say that "the Lord gave and the Lord has taken, and may the Lord's name be praised". And leave it at that. The fact is that I can't. Because frankly, we say that only to comfort ourselves. Also in most cases, we really don't want to accept the finality of death .....Deep down our souls, and never mind how old, rational, or scientific we are, we wish we and those we care for and love never die. Or if there is, then it's in the form of a long holiday when and where we shall rest according to how much rest we need. We would get repaired of our injuries; get cured of our diseases; get straightened out of other problems, confusions and general life's difficulties, remade, and possibly rebranded. Doris, I know that nobody is indispensable. However, how many people did you know who were like you in sheer energy, active, activism, and commitment to meaningful work? Dear Free Spirit, according to the Ghana Journalist Association (GJA) it did not matter what fate, family, friends, or the public threw at you, you always had a smile on your face. I always felt safe because I knew you were somewhere in this city. Besides, I could always drop your name and boast that I was your teacher. My Dear Doris, I shall always miss you, and wherever you are going, Godspeed. And may The Good Lord keep you safe. Yaawo ojogbann! Damirifa due! Nyame nfa wo sie! Ama Ata Aidoo

02/09/2020 10:28 AM
Ama Ata Aidoo

TRIBUTE TO DR. DORIS YAA DARTEY (1953-2020) My Dear Doris, to say I miss you already does not begin to describe how I feel. So many days after the shocking news of your death hit me a

nd the Ghana media space, l have kept asking myself why l cannot just be a good Christian and say that "the Lord gave and the Lord has taken, and may the Lord's name be praised". And leave it at that. The fact is that I can't. Because frankly, we say that only to comfort ourselves. Also in most cases, we really don't want to accept the finality of death .....Deep down our souls, and never mind how old, rational, or scientific we are, we wish we and those we care for and love never die. Or if there is, then it's in the form of a long holiday when and where we shall rest according to how much rest we need. We would get repaired of our injuries; get cured of our diseases; get straightened out of other problems, confusions and general life's difficulties, remade, and possibly rebranded. Doris, I know that nobody is indispensable. However, how many people did you know who were like you in sheer energy, active, activism, and commitment to meaningful work? Dear Free Spirit, according to the Ghana Journalist Association (GJA) it did not matter what fate, family, friends, or the public threw at you, you always had a smile on your face. I always felt safe because I knew you were somewhere in this city. Besides, I could always drop your name and boast that I was your teacher. My Dear Doris, I shall always miss you, and wherever you are going, Godspeed. And may The Good Lord keep you safe. Yaawo ojogbann! Damirifa due! Nyame nfa wo sie! Ama Ata Aidoo

02/09/2020 10:28 AM
Victoria Wemakor

You were an epitome of beauty. Simple and elegant with a good heart. I met you just a couple of years of ago. But your impart in my life was so great. I will be missing you so much.

But God has a plan for your life and wants to give you rest from all your struggles and pain. Your night has come. Continue to rest in the bossom of the Lord. Sleep well till we meet to part no more. SLEEP ON. We love you, but God love you more.

25/08/2020 10:05 AM
Isaac Robert Aidoo

lusbytes assigned me to her for mentoring. She was to nurture me to deepen my focus on oil and gas, a task she proved more than equal to. Dr Dartey never finished her mentoring. Well after

the project was over, she continued to make an impact on my life till her passing on that fateful day, Sunday July 19, 2020. The training programme which saw a collaboration between Penplusbytes and the Ghana Oil and Gas for Inclusive Growth (GOGIG) As part of the training project, participants were given mentors to supervise stories and provide guidance. Dr Dartey never minced words when it came to meeting deadlines for submission of stories. She had been engaged for a purpose – she would insist on keeping to the agreed contract. For her, anyone whom she supervised had to shine. She had discovered me and didn’t understand why I hadn’t won any journalism awards. I was not interested in making any entry for awards, but that was the last she wanted to hear. The Penplusbytes mentorship project lasted just a month but Dr Dartey became a life-long mentor, coach, mother and friend, providing guidance on almost every aspect of life. The veteran communication and extractive governance expert was an anti-corruption crusader par excellence. She was an authority on good governance and wrote extensively on same. Resourcefulness Dr Dartey was extremely resourceful. She got me into reading about good and visionary leadership and its impact on a country’s development and progress. She personally procured some books for me. Upon my return from a tour in Dubai in 2019 she purchased and presented ‘MY VISION, Challenges in the Race for Excellence’ authored by Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai. In one of my engagements with her in February this year, we discussed doing book reviews and publishing the reviews in the paper I edit. She followed up with a message, “Journalism is not just about news! That’s why all world class newspapers have book review sessions. Books are educational, rich sources of knowledge.” Financial advisor She was one who consistently sounded into my ears these words, “invest some money toward your retirement.” At exactly 4:55 pm on March, 8, 2020, I got a message via whatsapp from Dr Dartey. It said, “We’re in March. Have you deposited anything into your investment account?” Departure Dr Dartey, you made your mark. You were indeed an angel. We’re grateful for all that you did while on earth. Mama, continue to rest in the bosom of the LORD. Bye bye!

22/08/2020 11:36 AM
Darkoa Ofori-Yirenkyi

Mama, to me still too raw to behold, Your last breath, as you sleep lifeless That my voice of reason forever shut You who loved talking quit talking, silence unbearable! Wealth of knowle

dge forever sealed Mama, too painful to behold, That the gripping effect of loss deeply felt A reminder each day that you're gone, but yet feel close Claiming you who we never wanted to let go But, "my daughter, I'm suffering" was too hard to hear Where suffering is the intimation of something broken in the physical The Trilema! If only wishes were always granted Mama, too soon to behold, though the heart pains the vacuum felt tears flowing each day because He Lives, We Shall Live. Mama, too glad to behold that you're with your creator worshiping HIM and showing gratitude for "The Blood" The greatest sacrifice that you spent your life talking about You sit with face to face.

21/08/2020 01:55 PM
Isaac Robert Aidoo

‘Dr Doris Yaa Dartey made a lasting impression on me’ By Isaac AIDOO , ACCRA HAD I met her earlier in life I would have achieved more than I presently have. Dr Doris Yaa Darte

y made a lasting impression on me in the few years I knew her. She was the doyen of the communications profession and media practice. The astute communicator and financial advisor in her own right was full of ideas about life, about business and finance, investment, family life and a lot more. Though a woman, she dared the odds, made huge inroads into fields that could pass for the reserve of men. Intelligent, smart Dr Dartey would glean story ideas from her personal experiences and prompt me to follow through on them. She would ask probing and engaging questions and they proved very useful leads for me. I had my first encounter with Dr Dartey on the telephone, when she was engaged by the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) to elicit feedback from journalists who had received training from the Institute on extractives-oil, gas and mining. Indeed, I had participated in series of training sessions and workshops both overseas and in-country, thanks to NRGI and later Penplusbytes. After that engaging phone interview, I met Dr Dartey personally during my training sessions at Penplusbytes , an oil and gas focused and Information Communication Technology (ICT) firm where she came in as a course facilitator. She made thought-provoking presentations, asked intriguing questions that none had averted their minds to and took us into the realms of investigative journalism. A true mentor, coach I got to know her even better when Penplusbytes assigned me to her for mentoring. She was to nurture me to deepen my focus on oil and gas, a task she proved more than equal to. Dr Dartey never finished her mentoring. Well after the project was over, she continued to make an impact on my life till her passing on that fateful day, Sunday July 19, 2020. The training programme which saw a collaboration between Penplusbytes and the Ghana Oil and Gas for Inclusive Growth (GOGIG) As part of the training project, participants were given mentors to supervise stories and provide guidance. Dr Dartey never minced words when it came to meeting deadlines for submission of stories. She had been engaged for a purpose – she would insist on keeping to the agreed contract. For her, anyone whom she supervised had to shine. She had discovered me and didn’t understand why I hadn’t won any journalism awards. I was not interested in making any entry for awards, but that was the last she wanted to hear. The Penplusbytes mentorship project lasted just a month but Dr Dartey became a life-long mentor, coach, mother and friend, providing guidance on almost every aspect of life. The veteran communication and extractive governance expert was an anti-corruption crusader par excellence. She was an authority on good governance and wrote extensively on same. Resourcefulness Dr Dartey was extremely resourceful. She got me into reading about good and visionary leadership and its impact on a country’s development and progress. She personally procured some books for me. Upon my return from a tour in Dubai in 2019 she purchased and presented ‘MY VISION, Challenges in the Race for Excellence’ authored by Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai. In one of my engagements with her in February this year, we discussed doing book reviews and publishing the reviews in the paper I edit. She followed up with a message, “Journalism is not just about news! That’s why all world class newspapers have book review sessions. Books are educational, rich sources of knowledge.” Financial advisor She was one who consistently sounded into my ears these words, “invest some money toward your retirement.” At exactly 4:55 pm on March, 8, 2020, I got a message via whatsapp from Dr Dartey. It said, “We’re in March. Have you deposited anything into your investment account?” Departure Dr Dartey, you made your mark. You were indeed an angel. We’re grateful for all that you did while on earth. Mama, continue to rest in the bosom of the LORD. Bye bye!

21/08/2020 12:37 PM
Isaac Robert Aidoo

‘Dr Doris Yaa Dartey made a lasting impression on me’ By Isaac AIDOO , ACCRA HAD I met her earlier in life I would have achieved more than I presently have. Dr Doris Yaa Darte

y made a lasting impression on me in the few years I knew her. She was the doyen of the communications profession and media practice. The astute communicator and financial advisor in her own right was full of ideas about life, about business and finance, investment, family life and a lot more. Though a woman, she dared the odds, made huge inroads into fields that could pass for the reserve of men. Intelligent, smart Dr Dartey would glean story ideas from her personal experiences and prompt me to follow through on them. She would ask probing and engaging questions and they proved very useful leads for me. I had my first encounter with Dr Dartey on the telephone, when she was engaged by the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) to elicit feedback from journalists who had received training from the Institute on extractives-oil, gas and mining. Indeed, I had participated in series of training sessions and workshops both overseas and in-country, thanks to NRGI and later Penplusbytes. After that engaging phone interview, I met Dr Dartey personally during my training sessions at Penplusbytes , an oil and gas focused and Information Communication Technology (ICT) firm where she came in as a course facilitator. She made thought-provoking presentations, asked intriguing questions that none had averted their minds to and took us into the realms of investigative journalism. A true mentor, coach I got to know her even better when Penplusbytes assigned me to her for mentoring. She was to nurture me to deepen my focus on oil and gas, a task she proved more than equal to. Dr Dartey never finished her mentoring. Well after the project was over, she continued to make an impact on my life till her passing on that fateful day, Sunday July 19, 2020. The training programme which saw a collaboration between Penplusbytes and the Ghana Oil and Gas for Inclusive Growth (GOGIG) As part of the training project, participants were given mentors to supervise stories and provide guidance. Dr Dartey never minced words when it came to meeting deadlines for submission of stories. She had been engaged for a purpose – she would insist on keeping to the agreed contract. For her, anyone whom she supervised had to shine. She had discovered me and didn’t understand why I hadn’t won any journalism awards. I was not interested in making any entry for awards, but that was the last she wanted to hear. The Penplusbytes mentorship project lasted just a month but Dr Dartey became a life-long mentor, coach, mother and friend, providing guidance on almost every aspect of life. The veteran communication and extractive governance expert was an anti-corruption crusader par excellence. She was an authority on good governance and wrote extensively on same. Resourcefulness Dr Dartey was extremely resourceful. She got me into reading about good and visionary leadership and its impact on a country’s development and progress. She personally procured some books for me. Upon my return from a tour in Dubai in 2019 she purchased and presented ‘MY VISION, Challenges in the Race for Excellence’ authored by Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai. In one of my engagements with her in February this year, we discussed doing book reviews and publishing the reviews in the paper I edit. She followed up with a message, “Journalism is not just about news! That’s why all world class newspapers have book review sessions. Books are educational, rich sources of knowledge.” Financial advisor She was one who consistently sounded into my ears these words, “invest some money toward your retirement.” At exactly 4:55 pm on March, 8, 2020, I got a message via whatsapp from Dr Dartey. It said, “We’re in March. Have you deposited anything into your investment account?” Departure Dr Dartey, you made your mark. You were indeed an angel. We’re grateful for all that you did while on earth. Mama, continue to rest in the bosom of the LORD. Bye bye!

20/08/2020 09:53 PM
Isaac Robert Aidoo

lusbytes assigned me to her for mentoring. She was to nurture me to deepen my focus on oil and gas, a task she proved more than equal to. Dr Dartey never finished her mentoring. Well after

the project was over, she continued to make an impact on my life till her passing on that fateful day, Sunday July 19, 2020. The training programme which saw a collaboration between Penplusbytes and the Ghana Oil and Gas for Inclusive Growth (GOGIG) As part of the training project, participants were given mentors to supervise stories and provide guidance. Dr Dartey never minced words when it came to meeting deadlines for submission of stories. She had been engaged for a purpose – she would insist on keeping to the agreed contract. For her, anyone whom she supervised had to shine. She had discovered me and didn’t understand why I hadn’t won any journalism awards. I was not interested in making any entry for awards, but that was the last she wanted to hear. The Penplusbytes mentorship project lasted just a month but Dr Dartey became a life-long mentor, coach, mother and friend, providing guidance on almost every aspect of life. The veteran communication and extractive governance expert was an anti-corruption crusader par excellence. She was an authority on good governance and wrote extensively on same. Resourcefulness Dr Dartey was extremely resourceful. She got me into reading about good and visionary leadership and its impact on a country’s development and progress. She personally procured some books for me. Upon my return from a tour in Dubai in 2019 she purchased and presented ‘MY VISION, Challenges in the Race for Excellence’ authored by Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai. In one of my engagements with her in February this year, we discussed doing book reviews and publishing the reviews in the paper I edit. She followed up with a message, “Journalism is not just about news! That’s why all world class newspapers have book review sessions. Books are educational, rich sources of knowledge.” Financial advisor She was one who consistently sounded into my ears these words, “invest some money toward your retirement.” At exactly 4:55 pm on March, 8, 2020, I got a message via whatsapp from Dr Dartey. It said, “We’re in March. Have you deposited anything into your investment account?” Departure Dr Dartey, you made your mark. You were indeed an angel. We’re grateful for all that you did while on earth. Mama, continue to rest in the bosom of the LORD. Bye bye!

20/08/2020 09:51 PM
Darkoa

He giveth more grace He giveth more grace when the burdens grow greater, He sendeth more strength when the labors increase, To added affliction He addeth His mercy, To multiplied tr

ials, His multiplied peace. His love has no limit, His grace has no measure, His power no boundary known unto men, For out of His infinite riches in Jesus, He giveth and giveth and giveth again. 2 When we have exhausted our store of endurance, When our strength has failed ere the day is half-done, When we reach the end of our hoarded resources, Our Father’s full giving is only begun. Rest Well My Mama in the bosom of the Almighty God.

20/08/2020 07:44 PM
Isaac Robert Aidoo

lusbytes assigned me to her for mentoring. She was to nurture me to deepen my focus on oil and gas, a task she proved more than equal to. Dr Dartey never finished her mentoring. Well after

the project was over, she continued to make an impact on my life till her passing on that fateful day, Sunday July 19, 2020. The training programme which saw a collaboration between Penplusbytes and the Ghana Oil and Gas for Inclusive Growth (GOGIG) As part of the training project, participants were given mentors to supervise stories and provide guidance. Dr Dartey never minced words when it came to meeting deadlines for submission of stories. She had been engaged for a purpose – she would insist on keeping to the agreed contract. For her, anyone whom she supervised had to shine. She had discovered me and didn’t understand why I hadn’t won any journalism awards. I was not interested in making any entry for awards, but that was the last she wanted to hear. The Penplusbytes mentorship project lasted just a month but Dr Dartey became a life-long mentor, coach, mother and friend, providing guidance on almost every aspect of life. The veteran communication and extractive governance expert was an anti-corruption crusader par excellence. She was an authority on good governance and wrote extensively on same. Resourcefulness Dr Dartey was extremely resourceful. She got me into reading about good and visionary leadership and its impact on a country’s development and progress. She personally procured some books for me. Upon my return from a tour in Dubai in 2019 she purchased and presented ‘MY VISION, Challenges in the Race for Excellence’ authored by Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai. In one of my engagements with her in February this year, we discussed doing book reviews and publishing the reviews in the paper I edit. She followed up with a message, “Journalism is not just about news! That’s why all world class newspapers have book review sessions. Books are educational, rich sources of knowledge.” Financial advisor She was one who consistently sounded into my ears these words, “invest some money toward your retirement.” At exactly 4:55 pm on March, 8, 2020, I got a message via whatsapp from Dr Dartey. It said, “We’re in March. Have you deposited anything into your investment account?” Departure Dr Dartey, you made your mark. You were indeed an angel. We’re grateful for all that you did while on earth. Mama, continue to rest in the bosom of the LORD. Bye bye!

20/08/2020 10:27 AM
Freda Obeng, Krystle, Nana Abena And Ann-Christine

Our sweet Auntie, Grandma and Sister Doris, we cannot say and will not say you are gone, you are just away. We had a wonderful Auntie, Grandma and Sister. Always so kind, loving and caring

. Always seeing you consistently put others needs before yours and offering a helping hand. Sweet Auntie, Grandma and Sister , you were a fighter and stayed positive in the midst of the unknown. So full of life, making jokes to make everyone happy. Talking about how we’re going to slap cancer with all those Diamonds, Chanel and Gucci and twerking upon our victory. Wondering how the plantain sellers could afford the treatment you were getting and being so worried about how they would survive. You were so strong and put all your hope and faith in God, with a beautiful heart, soul and mind. We will forever miss your witty personality and remarks. You always knew what to say and how to say it to put a smile on our faces even at the most unexpected times. Because of you our home was full of life. Through you came new life to us, you brought us your home and family and expanded our family. Which is the best gift ever, we love you so very much. We will always keep you in our hearts. We are still learning to come to terms with the fact that God has you in His keeping. You are at peace and no longer in pain. Till we meet again . Da yie

19/08/2020 04:47 PM
Prof. Perpetua S. Dadzie

We met when we were commissioned in 2015 as NMC members. Little did I know that we would bond so easily. We exchanged numbers and started WhatsApp messages to each other. Big Sis, as I aff

ectionately called her, was a very warm-hearted person. I was very inquisitive about her career and questioned why she was not teaching at the Department of Communication Studies, University of Ghana knowing very well her academic status. Our long conversations on this issue never ended and we continued any time the Commission took us out of Accra for business. Big Sis also briefed me on the journalism landscape in Ghana as I did not have deep insight into that field. We had some ‘hard political talk’ about happenings in Ghana and we consoled ourselves that it would be well one day. Big Sis and myself shared a common interest in books. She would borrow books from my library and faithfully return them. I was so glad being of service to her and indeed, that made our bond stronger. She exhibited love and thoughtfulness all the time. I remember her whatsapp message to me when I missed a meeting. She said, Hello girl, you were absent from NMC meeting. Are you okay? She knew I loved to learn new things and would not deliberately miss a meeting. Big Sis, it is so sad that you have to leave us so soon. We are consoled that you are in a better place where there is no sickness nor pain. Fare thee well. Rest in Perfect Peace.

17/08/2020 12:24 PM
Freda Obeng, Krystle, Nana Abena And Ann-Christine

Our sweet Auntie, Grandma and Sister Doris, we cannot say and will not say you are gone, you are just away. We had a wonderful Auntie, Grandma and Sister. Always so kind, loving and caring

. Always seeing you consistently put others needs before yours and offering a helping hand. Sweet Auntie, Grandma and Sister , you were a fighter and stayed positive in the midst of the unknown. So full of life, making jokes to make everyone happy. Talking about how we’re going to slap cancer with all those Diamonds, Chanel and Gucci and twerking upon our victory. Wondering how the plantain sellers could afford the treatment you were getting and being so worried about how they would survive. You were so strong and put all your hope and faith in God, with a beautiful heart, soul and mind. We will forever miss your witty personality and remarks. You always knew what to say and how to say it to put a smile on our faces even at the most unexpected times. Because of you our home was full of life. Through you came new life to us, you brought us your home and family and expanded our family. Which is the best gift ever, we love you so very much. We will always keep you in our hearts. We are still learning to come to terms with the fact that God has you in His keeping. You are at peace and no longer in pain. Till we meet again . Da yie

17/08/2020 11:56 AM
Audrey Gadzekpo

Doris lives with us in memory and in our hearts. Sleep peacefully sister. 🙏🏿

16/08/2020 10:23 PM
Nana Kwasi Gyan-Aprnteng

Dr. Doris Dartey – A Good Human Being Exactly eight years ago, in July/August 2012, the STAR-Ghana Programme commissioned Dr. Doris Dartey, whose funeral was held two days ago, and me t

o travel around Ghana to interview and document work being done by the Programme’s grant recipients who were working on election projects. Billed as “Roving Columnists”, we divided the country vertically in two; I took the West, which comprised the Central, Western, Brong-Ahafo and Upper West Regions while she took the rest made up of Eastern, Volta, Northern, and Upper East Regions. We agreed to share Greater Accra and Ashanti. I was in the Upper West capital, Wa, when I got a call from Dr. Dartey whom I and most people simply called Yaa Doris. She was calling me from the Volta Region where she had chanced upon a frail old woman whose situation worried Yaa. It was not just the material poverty; she did not seem to have anyone in her life and had been virtually abandoned. Yaa was distressed by the woman’s condition and spoke at length about how unfair life could be; she just could not let it go. The following day, she set about doing what she could do to make the old lady comfortable. She sent me a picture in which the old lady had rewarded her with a toothless smile. She was ecstatic that she had succeeded in getting that abandoned woman to smile. I thought that was the end of the matter. Years later, I got to know that in the middle of facing her own challenges, Yaa was still in touch with her old woman and continued to support her in many ways. That was Yaa Doris in a nutshell. At any given moment in her life, she was supporting people in different kinds of challenges which she had taken on board. I am not at liberty to divulge names, but without her help, some situations would have ended differently. For example, when a prominent relative of hers passed away, she left everything to stay with his widow to provide comfort for her. She did not count the cost in terms of time or money. She did what she had to do. End of story. Most tributes to Yaa since she passed away on July 20 this year have spoken of her sunny nature, sense of humour, commitment and dedication to her professional calling and her hard work. Yes, she worked hard; too hard maybe, but gave away much of what she earned to other people. She was generous to a fault; the Akan expression that she would give you the food in her mouth, aptly applied. She was not a person to put labels on people; she would often describe someone as a “good human being”. For her, that was the highest accolade. If we were to put a label on her, one of them would be a “fierce feminist”, though I never heard her use that word. She would instead use the word sisterhood when she felt that female solidarity was required. But she was definitely a fierce advocate for women’s rights and empowerment. She celebrated women’s achievement and considered it a scandal that Ghana had so few women in Parliament and other state institutions. The quality she admired most was loyalty. When Yaa was in your corner, you knew you had the mother of all support. She was loyal to people who deserved it and demonstrated it in every possible way. But once you lost her trust, you knew it was for eternity because she did not take betrayal lightly. She has gone to her grave bearing no grudges but I know she lamented the loss of trust in some long friendships. Yaa believed passionately in the causes she supported. For her, it was “drink deep or taste not”. Most people who followed the news or read her column knew her as Ghana’s Madam Sanitation, or as she liked to say, “borla woman”, borla being the local term for rubbish. Yaa was devoted to the task of cleaning the environment. Her pet hate was open defecation but she did not hold it against those who did it; she thought the state had let them down. Above all, she was the most complete communication devotee I have ever known. Of course, she taught and practiced communication for a living but she believed that communication, or rather good communication was a requirement of both good governance and conscience. This meant that we are all individually and corporately required to communicate well. In that sense, clarity is a question of conscience. So, for her, there is no place for verbosity, and the word she probably hated most was “demise” when simple “death” would be sufficient. She was a joyous workaholic. We worked together at the National Media Commission but also had several assignments together. In every instance, if there was work to do, she would volunteer and deliver on time. She took her assignments seriously – as the Chairperson of Graphic Communication Group, Member of the National Media Commission, numerous communication training jobs in Ghana and abroad, - all were treated as if her very life depended on them. I remember our trip to a conference of the African Communication Regulators Network (ACRAN) in Cotonou, Benin where I was elected president of the continental body. Yaa developed a serious flu from the moment we arrived but would not take to her bed without going through and editing my speech and making useful changes in the night in her room while I was fast asleep in my room. She worked tirelessly without complaint. Indeed, with joy. That is what most people will remember about Dr. Doris Yaa Dartey. (She never ceased to be irritatingly amused when people called her Doc; I did that when I wanted to annoy her). She oozed joy. She was an incurable hugger. She would hug anyone she thought needed a hug and often rewarded people with a hug. She was such a bundle of joy. Simply, a good human being. Ghana’s media and communication sector has lost a gem. She will be sorely missed.

11/08/2020 09:04 PM
Nana Kwasi Gyan-Aprnteng

Dr. Doris Dartey – A Good Human Being Exactly eight years ago, in July/August 2012, the STAR-Ghana Programme commissioned Dr. Doris Dartey, whose funeral was held two days ago, and me t

o travel around Ghana to interview and document work being done by the Programme’s grant recipients who were working on election projects. Billed as “Roving Columnists”, we divided the country vertically in two; I took the West, which comprised the Central, Western, Brong-Ahafo and Upper West Regions while she took the rest made up of Eastern, Volta, Northern, and Upper East Regions. We agreed to share Greater Accra and Ashanti. I was in the Upper West capital, Wa, when I got a call from Dr. Dartey whom I and most people simply called Yaa Doris. She was calling me from the Volta Region where she had chanced upon a frail old woman whose situation worried Yaa. It was not just the material poverty; she did not seem to have anyone in her life and had been virtually abandoned. Yaa was distressed by the woman’s condition and spoke at length about how unfair life could be; she just could not let it go. The following day, she set about doing what she could do to make the old lady comfortable. She sent me a picture in which the old lady had rewarded her with a toothless smile. She was ecstatic that she had succeeded in getting that abandoned woman to smile. I thought that was the end of the matter. Years later, I got to know that in the middle of facing her own challenges, Yaa was still in touch with her old woman and continued to support her in many ways. That was Yaa Doris in a nutshell. At any given moment in her life, she was supporting people in different kinds of challenges which she had taken on board. I am not at liberty to divulge names, but without her help, some situations would have ended differently. For example, when a prominent relative of hers passed away, she left everything to stay with his widow to provide comfort for her. She did not count the cost in terms of time or money. She did what she had to do. End of story. Most tributes to Yaa since she passed away on July 20 this year have spoken of her sunny nature, sense of humour, commitment and dedication to her professional calling and her hard work. Yes, she worked hard; too hard maybe, but gave away much of what she earned to other people. She was generous to a fault; the Akan expression that she would give you the food in her mouth, aptly applied. She was not a person to put labels on people; she would often describe someone as a “good human being”. For her, that was the highest accolade. If we were to put a label on her, one of them would be a “fierce feminist”, though I never heard her use that word. She would instead use the word sisterhood when she felt that female solidarity was required. But she was definitely a fierce advocate for women’s rights and empowerment. She celebrated women’s achievement and considered it a scandal that Ghana had so few women in Parliament and other state institutions. The quality she admired most was loyalty. When Yaa was in your corner, you knew you had the mother of all support. She was loyal to people who deserved it and demonstrated it in every possible way. But once you lost her trust, you knew it was for eternity because she did not take betrayal lightly. She has gone to her grave bearing no grudges but I know she lamented the loss of trust in some long friendships. Yaa believed passionately in the causes she supported. For her, it was “drink deep or taste not”. Most people who followed the news or read her column knew her as Ghana’s Madam Sanitation, or as she liked to say, “borla woman”, borla being the local term for rubbish. Yaa was devoted to the task of cleaning the environment. Her pet hate was open defecation but she did not hold it against those who did it; she thought the state had let them down. Above all, she was the most complete communication devotee I have ever known. Of course, she taught and practiced communication for a living but she believed that communication, or rather good communication was a requirement of both good governance and conscience. This meant that we are all individually and corporately required to communicate well. In that sense, clarity is a question of conscience. So, for her, there is no place for verbosity, and the word she probably hated most was “demise” when simple “death” would be sufficient. She was a joyous workaholic. We worked together at the National Media Commission but also had several assignments together. In every instance, if there was work to do, she would volunteer and deliver on time. She took her assignments seriously – as the Chairperson of Graphic Communication Group, Member of the National Media Commission, numerous communication training jobs in Ghana and abroad, - all were treated as if her very life depended on them. I remember our trip to a conference of the African Communication Regulators Network (ACRAN) in Cotonou, Benin where I was elected president of the continental body. Yaa developed a serious flu from the moment we arrived but would not take to her bed without going through and editing my speech and making useful changes in the night in her room while I was fast asleep in my room. She worked tirelessly without complaint. Indeed, with joy. That is what most people will remember about Dr. Doris Yaa Dartey. (She never ceased to be irritatingly amused when people called her Doc; I did that when I wanted to annoy her). She oozed joy. She was an incurable hugger. She would hug anyone she thought needed a hug and often rewarded people with a hug. She was such a bundle of joy. Simply, a good human being. Ghana’s media and communication sector has lost a gem. She will be sorely missed.

11/08/2020 12:02 PM
Amakey Afaglo

My Tribute To My Grandmother, Yayo (First Grandchild - Amakey Afaglo (“Num ber one”) Yayo, it’s so weird writing a tribute to you. I’m still in shock and denial. I thank you for a

ll the encouragement. Thank you for being my cheerleader. You’re so dear to me and all your grandchildren. Anytime I was going to write an exam or have any major event in my life you would make me so confident about myself and you never ceased to let me know how proud I made you. It brought me so much joy making you happy. You called me your number one , gave me the name “BEAUTY AND BRAINS”, as well as my own name Amakey. You showed us all an UNEXPLAINABLE love. You spoiled me and my siblings and gave us all we asked for. We would come to you with things we wanted to learn or classes we wanted to take and you would make all the calls and pay in a heartbeat. You and I had some deep conversations, and you were so enthusiastic about my future. The last time I saw you, which was at the airport in 2019, you didn’t want to let me go. Everyone else left to go t 08/08/2020 02:46 PM

11/08/2020 07:37 AM
Arvind Singhal

I am so sorry to hear about Doris’ passing. Doris was in the first doctoral class I taught at Ohio University (Fall 1990) and I remember her term paper was on the diffusion of pit latrin

es in Ghana, and I served on her Graduate committee. In 1994, she and her family hosted me in her village, and we remained in touch, exchanging mail every few years! May Doris rest in piece—a cheerful, warm hearted, gracious and can-do soul! Thank you for posting Parichart Sthapitanonda. I am copying Mohammad A. Auwal who was also in the first INCO 710 class I taught in RTVC 201

11/08/2020 07:31 AM
Ty Carr

My dear Doris....your passing brings true meaning to the term, “gone too soon!” I am as fortunate as the many who had the opportunity to meet you and get to know you. May you rest in e

ternal peace 🙏🏾💕

10/08/2020 11:08 PM
Koo Tachie - Fellow Presby Church Member (2003 - 2005), Columbus Ohio

Rest in peace Dr. Dartey. You were a true lady and an African intellectual.

08/08/2020 07:16 AM

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